Italiano Farmacia on line: comprare cialis senza ricetta, acquistare viagra internet.

Appenglos .pdf

APPENDIX A
Appendix A tabulates the monthly cost (US $) of available anti-hypertensive and lipid lowering drugs individually in each SAARC country. For each drug
within a class the minimum effective and the ceiling recommended dosage has been listed. For both, the minimum and the maximum monthly cost
packages have been calculated. These cost packages are based on the available minimum and maximal dosages of each drug in the market, in the
absence of which cost for the minimum and the maximum recommended doses have been calculated from the cost of available dosage in the market.
These costs have been viewed as a percentage of the monthly rural and urban household incomes and as a percentage of the monthly household heath
expenditure by the private and the public sector. Local currencies have been converted into US $ based on the exchange rates as of July 18, 2001
displayed on http://theFinancial.com
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
PAKISTAN
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Ace Inhibitors
A2 Receptor Blockers
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Beta Blockers
Ca Channel Blockers
Diuretics
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Fibric acid derivatives
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Ace Inhibitors
A2 Receptor Blockers
Beta Blockers
Ca Channel Blockers
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly co st of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Diuretics
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Fibric acid derivatives
BANGLADESH
Ace Inhibitors
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
avai lable
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
A2 Receptor Blockers
Beta Blockers
Ca Channel Blockers
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Diuretics
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Fibric acid derivatives
Ace Inhibitors
A2 Receptor Blockers
Beta Blockers
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Ca Channel Blockers
Diuretics
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Fibric acid derivatives
SRI LANKA
Ace Inhibitors
A2 Receptor Blockers
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Minimum Maximum
Drug by Class
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Beta Blockers
Ca Channel Blockers
Diuretics
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
Cost of therapy as a
percentage of the
percentage of the
Monthly cost of
percentage of the
percentage of the average
monthly household
monthly household
average rural
urban household income health expenditure by
health expenditure by
household income
the public sector
the private sector
Drug by Class
Minimum Maximum
available
available
available available
available
available
available
available
available
available
Fibric acid derivatives
Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia APPENDIX B
A Heart Healthy Eating Plan for South Asians
We recommend that health professionals use this guide while recommending a Lean meat, poultry and fish
Daily allowance: a serving a day from this group; where applicable and possible at least 2 of these daily servings a week should be of fish. It is preferable to avoid beef. Fat should always be trimmed off meat (except fish meat) before cooking. ? One serving of beef or mutton is equal to 3 full size botis.1 ? One serving of chicken is ½ a chicken breast or chicken leg with thigh (without ? One serving of fish is the size of a deck of playing cards. ? A one-cup serving of cooked beans, peas or lentils (masur, maash, channay, lobia), chick peas (cholay), can replace a serving of meat. Daily allowance: due to the high cholesterol content of egg yolks, as a general rule, if one egg is eaten then cholesterol in any other form through o ils, meat or dairy products, should be reduced. However, egg white is a very good source of protein, has no cholesterol and can be taken daily. Fruits and vegetables
Daily allowance: 5 or more servings a day. ? One serving is equal to 1 medium-size piece of fruit (e.g. small apple, small banana) or ½-1 cup cooked or raw vegetables. ? Coconuts are very high in saturated fat and should be eaten only very occasionally. Jaggery (palm sugar – made from the sap of the coconut palm) is a high calorie item and should b e eaten only as a treat. 1 A standard size for pieces of meat used in a curry. 85 Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia Low fat milk products
Daily allowance: servings per day depend on age; for adults aged 19 and above, 2 One serving is 1 cup of fat-free (packaged) or fresh milk with the cream
removed or 1 cup yogurt made with such milk or 1 oz. Low- fat cheese or ½
cup low fat cottage cheese.

Breads, cereals, pasta and starchy vegetables

Daily allowance: 6 servings a day. ? One serving is equal to one slice of bread, one chapatti or dosa (size of a small plate), half a naan (saada not roghni), idli, makki ki roti, etc. or 1
cup of cooked rice or pasta or ¼ - ½ cup of starchy vegetables
(potatoes, corn, green peas, sweet potatoes).
Fats and Oils
Daily allowance: No more than a total of 2-4 servings per day. ? One serving is 1 tbsp. of vegetable oil like canola, corn, olive, safflower, ? or 1 ½ tsp. of seeds or nuts like almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, pistas,
? Note: Remember that all home made or commercially prepared baked and processed foods like cakes, buns, doughnuts, mithai, sweet dishes, and biscuits contain fat in the form of butter, ghee, or oil. This must be taken into account in ? Avoid ghee, coconut, palm kernel and palm oil (all solid at room temperature) as they are very high in saturated fats and should be avoided. ? In Sri Lanka coconut oil is very widely used; its use should be Recommendations for Diabetics:
In addition to the above, foods that have a high content of sugar like sugar itself or foods containing high concentrations of sugar are to be avoided. Also to be avoided are very sweet fruits like mangoes, dates, melons and grapes. Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia APPENDIX C
Methodology

At the executive council meeting of the SAARC Cardiac Society held in Kathmandu, Nepal on July 22, 2000, it was unanimously decided to develop a set of “Guidelines for the Prevention of Coronary Heart Diseases in the SAARC Region”. The executive council selected the chief coordinator to steer the development of the guidelines at a central level and regional coordinators to steer input at regional levels in addition to liaising with the chief coordinator. It was also decided that all the members of the SAARC executive council would serve as the SAARC consensus panel, and that the regional coordinators should set up regional consensus panels in their own countries. It was also agreed upon that an international advisory board should be constituted which would give its input to the final draft of the manuscript. The preparation phase consisted of pre-evaluation surveys, literature review, writing up the report, and input at different levels. Pre-evaluation Survey
Focus group discussions held independently in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh were employed as part of the pre-evaluation survey that guided the development of these guidelines with respect to its justification, format and content. A field guide was developed which sought responses relating to the relevance of these guidelines to practice in the region and the level of knowledge and beliefs of the health care providers.
Bangladesh: in Bangladesh a focus group discussion was held with the
participation of eight cardiologists and cardiovascular epidemiologists on September 28, 2000. The focus group summarized a review of literature on the prevalence of coronary heart disease within the country, in addition to furnishing details regarding the currently recommended national guidelines for primary and secondary prevention.
India:
the group in India felt that the recommendations should flow from a
broad based group both in terms of professional involvement as well as

representation from various regions of the country and therefore the views Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia of eminent experts all over the country were solicited. This was thought to be a good surrogate to focus group discussion, which was logistically impractical due to geographic constraints. There was near unanimity in the need for the guidelines and also for region specificity. Most respondents felt that the western guidelines were not ideally suited to or were either inadequate or inappropriate in the Indian context. Almost all the respondents were aware of the global CVD trends to a varying extent and believed that the trend had serious implications for the SAARC countries and therefore emphasized upon the need to develop and disseminate guidelines focusing on prevention. Input with regard to diet, physical activity and stress as part of the feedback, has been useful while drawing up the recommendations. It was identified that policy change was essential for bringing CVD on the health care agendas of the SAARC countries. The importance of coordinating efforts within the SAARC countries was also emphasized.
Pakistan: in Pakistan feedback was sought through questionnaires from
cardiologists, general physicians, epidemiologists, dietitians and heath policy makers. Majority of the participants of the focus group discussion found this exercise relevant within the framework of the regional health economics. It was agreed unanimously that investment in prevention for the region is imperative. There was a general agreement on the need to customize guidelines with a focus on economic issues while still working within the domain of scientific recommendations. A case was made for economically tiering these guidelines. Input relating to dietary recommendations was also received from the participants, as a result of which the Heart Healthy Eating plan for South Asians has been developed and is appended. With regard to the antismoking strategies, there were differing opinions. Some participants were inclined toward an aggressive policy-based approach whereas others favored a program-based strategy. Integration of physical activity as part of the heart health package was generally visualized as a problem for women; it was emphasized that this issue be addressed appropriately, in keeping with religious and cultural sensitivities. All participants saw pharmaceutical multinational distribution networks as a support structure and a possible conduit for the dissemination of these guidelines but expressed a concern over potential conflict of interest Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia particularly as these guidelines were seen as intending to decrease rather than encourage prescription expense. In this context all participants suggested using alternate means of disseminating these guidelines and highlighted the potential role of training trainers with support from the private and the public sector. After the focus group discussions and literature review, the chief coordinator prepared the initial draft, which was approved by the SAARC consensus panel members at the executive council meeting of the SAARC cardiac society in Chennai, India on December 9, 2000. Over the following months feedback received from the members of the International Advisory Board was also incorporated into the document. Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia Coronary Heart Disease Prevention in South Asia
GLOSSARY

CAD: Coronary Artery Disease CHD: Coronary Heart Disease COT: Cigarette and Othe r Forms of Tobacco Use CVD: Cardiovascular Disease CRP: C-Reactive Protein DALY: Daily Adjusted Life Years GNP: Gross National Product GDP: Gross Domestic Product HDL: JNC: Joint National Committee criteria LDL: Lp(a): Lipoprotein A NCD: Non Communicable Diseases NRT: Nicotine Replacement Therapy PAI:

Source: http://www.heartfile.org/pdf/APPENGLOS%20.pdf

Microsoft word - internet.doc

SV-BUNDESSIEGERZUCHTSCHAU 02.09.2005-04.09.2005 ULM Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) e.V. Gebrauchshundklasse Rüden Note Platz Kat.-Nr. Name des Hundes Eigentümer Verein für Deutsche Schäferhunde (SV) e.V. Note Platz Kat.-Nr. Name des Hundes Eigentümer Francisco J. A. Campos Mondragon Leon, Guanajuato 97 1152 Meico vom Wittelsbacher Schloß Verein für Deu

biomedsearch.com

Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 6 1219–1224 Interaction of tetracycline with RNA: photoincorporation into ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli Rudolf Oehler, Norbert Polacek, Guenter Steiner1 and Andrea Barta* Institute of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna Biocenter, Dr Bohrgasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna, Austria and1Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medici

Copyright © 2010-2014 Drugstore Pdf Search